Kim's Blog

Archive for Upcoming workshops

Next Workshop…May 23 & 24

The next workshop I will be teaching is at Coniagas Textiles in Maple Ridge, B.C. You can see a full description of the workshop under the Upcoming Workshops tab.

Date:         May 23 & 24, 2020

Workshop Fee: $125, does not include materials

Materials fee: $40

To register for this workshop, please contact Sherry Stewart, Coniagas Textiles at coniagas@me.com

Spinning Workshop suitable for all levels. Students must have a good working knowledge of their wheel and be able to confidently spin a continuous yarn.

Questions I am Often Asked

As I prepare for workshops over the coming year, I have been thinking about those questions most often asked by students. Hopefully some of their questions and my thoughts/answers will be of interest to you too over the next few posts.

Cheers, Kim

3 Spots Left – Sanjo Silk Spinning Workshop

On my wheel this evening. Mulberry Silk / Bombyx 50/50 Blend


I am teaching a Mulberry silk spinning workshop, April 28, 2019 at Sanjo Silk on Granville Island. If you have been tempted at all, there are three spots left. Details and a link to Eventbrite can be found under the Upcoming Workshops Tab. Look forward to seeing you there!

Cheers, Kim

 

ANWG 2019, Prince George

Confluences Conference : June 11-16, 2019

On-line Registration begins on January 27, 2019 at 9 am PST

The Prince George Fibre Arts Guild is hosting the 2019 ANWG Conference. I have posted the list of the seminars as well as a description of the Distaff workshop I will be leading under my “Upcoming Workshops” tab.

Further information regarding: the Conference Theme, the Event Schedule, Design Challenges, Conference Colours, Instructors’ Bios and last but not least and a full list of the workshops and seminars being offered can be found here.

The Conference is being held in Prince George’s downtown core. So as well as conference activities, shopping, the museum and some great dining can be found close by.

Look forward to seeing you there! Cheers, Kim

SANJO SILK WORKSHOP

This year I will be leading two workshops at SANJO SILK Ltd., 1531 Johnston Street, Granville Island, Vancouver, B.C.
Each one-day workshop is limited to 6 students.
The registration fees are: $120 for one workshop or $215 for both workshops. The registration fee for each workshop includes 150 grams of fibre, a full set of comprehensive notes as well as a binder for notes and samples.
Expanded workshop descriptions may be found under Claddagh Fibre Arts “Upcoming Workshops” tab.  

You can register through Eventbrite. Links can be found under “Upcoming Workshops”. 


April 28th : Mulberry Silk

This workshop  explores mulberry silk and the host of spinning preparations available to hand spinners. Over the course of the day you will have the pleasure of working with Mawata silk, spun silk, silk sliver, silk oil and a few of my favourite mulberry silk blends available from SANJO SILK’ s Studio.


September 8 : Non-mulberry Silk

I will introduce you to the world of non-mulberry silks. In this workshop you will spin exotic silk fibres such as Chinese tussah, Indian Tasar, Eri, Muga, Indian peduncle silk and some of their blends.


 

Upcoming Workshops 2019

Spinning and Dyeing workshops I am teaching in 2019 are now posted on my “Upcoming Workshops” page. Looking forward to another great year!

Silk Seduction, fall spinning workshop

Handspun Bluefaced Leicester/bleached tussah blend.

Handspun Bluefaced Leicester/bleached tussah blend.

September, 2015 I will be teaching a spinning workshop through the Greater Vancouver Weavers’ and Spinners Guild.  Silk has fascinated mankind since 2500 BC.  Silk’s luxurious hand and the way light dances along its surface is both mesmerizing and seductive. Hand spinning silk, however, can prove to be a bit challenging as one strives to tame those lustrous, slick, gossamer strands. Over the course of this 3 day workshop I will help participants to understand the adjustments needed to both their wheel and spinning method to successfully spin silk.

As well as reeling mulberry silk straight from the cocoon participants will spin a variety of fibre preparations from both mulberry and non-mulberry* silkworms. The silk fibres and blends we will explore include silk from: lustrous white mulberry silk in the form of sliver, hankies and noil; sliver and noil from honey-beige coloured tussah; shimmering golden muga sliver; cashmere-like creamy white eri sliver; and dark linen-like silk from tasar peduncle.

This photo is a BFL (Bluefaced Leicester)/bleached tussah blend.  Beautiful to work with and the resulting yarn has a soft silky hand, beautiful lustre and incredible drape.

*mulberry and non-mulberry silk are often referred to as Bombyx and wild silk respectively.

Nature Dyeing Workshops

Transmuting Nature’s Pigments

Armstrong, B.C. in July and Prince George, B.C. in October

IMG_2903

Wool silk blend

Johannes Itten once wrote…

”Only those who love colour are admitted to its beauty and imminent presence.  It affords utility to all, but unveils its deeper mysteries only to its devotees.”

The beauty, depth and richness of colour waiting to be harvested from fresh plant material is unparalleled and reminiscent of the colours we see in centuries old European tapestries and antique Japanese textiles. Discover the cornucopia of colour that can be extracted from plants and, with Kim’s help, learn the alchemy involved in:

  • extracting pigment from fresh plant materials
  • working with historically significant dyestuffs such as logwood, madder, osage orange and cochineal
  • dyeing with some of the newer nature dyeing extracts on the market
  • mordanting wool so that it is as light and wash fast as possible and
  • sustainable and safe harvesting techniques

Dahlia petals left and dahlia centers right.

The skeins is the photo at right are a good example of the subtleties in colour that participants will learn about when transmuting plant materials into dye pigments.  The skeins were dyed with pigments extracted from a red coloured dahlia.  The dahlia centres like the petals render an orange.  But the orange from the centers is slightly toned down and contains a bit of a greenish brown tinge.  Yum!